Trending Topics – How Utilities Can Deliver Value for Customers and Society

Utility managers pay attention to Wall Street, and often more can be learned about utilities’ top priorities by listening to shareholder earnings calls than regulatory proceedings. This is natural; as with any investor-owned company, managers of investor-owned utilities are obligated to maximize shareholder value. So it pays when regulators can find ways to align shareholder value creation with the public interest. Enter performance-based regulation. Efforts in this regard are underway across the nation—in states like Minnesota, Illinois, and New York.

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Trending Topics – Electricity Grid Integration in the West

Renewable integration in the West has forced reconsideration of system operations, planning, and markets. The key barrier to the optimal integration of renewable resources in the West is insufficient regional coordination. In order to develop a bulk electric grid that will be resilient in a dynamic future, the manner in which the system is planned and operated and the means by which entities are compensated for the energy, power, ancillary services, and emissions reductions they provide will need to evolve.

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Trending Topics – Should Utilities Own Distributed Storage?

Price declines in residential solar and new battery systems like Tesla’s Powerwall are likely to mean more solar-plus-battery systems at homes and businesses around the country. Like other distributed energy resources (DERs), customer-owned distributed storage puts competitive pressure on utilities by reducing customers’ reliance on the grid. As costs of DERs come down, customers can afford to rely less and less on the grid for electricity service. This phenomenon, coined “load defection” by smart folks at the Rocky Mountain Institute, is antithetical to traditional utility business models where increased electricity sales drive revenue growth.

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Refreshed Recommendations for a Power Sector in Flux

Though serious challenges remain, America has already come a long way in its transition toward a cleaner, more affordable, and more reliable grid. We see strong evidence that several of America’s Power Plan’s recommendations from 2013 have contributed to the modernization of the U.S. electricity system.

The price of renewables is plummeting, coal-fired power plants are retiring, and new technologies are changing customer relationships with utility companies. Across the country, the Clean Power Plan has forced conversations about optimizing the grid around higher shares of renewables and energy efficiency.

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Trending Topics – Are Policymakers Driving Blind with Yesterday’s Cost Numbers?

One of the most striking features of today’s modern energy economy is the pace and scale at which new technologies are changing an industry used to a much slower pace of evolution. New fossil fuel drilling techniques, drastically cheaper renewable generation, rapidly improving battery storage and power electronics, and the rise of information technology are either already or soon to be changing many of the fundamental features of our energy economy. Policymakers used to operating, planning, regulating and legislating in an environment where capital deployment happens over the course of years and assets maintain their value over the course of decades need to adapt their practices to account for accelerating change and disruptive feedback loops.

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America’s Power Plan Featured at SEPA’s 51st State Summit (UPDATE)

The Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) posted all of the submissions to the 51st State Challenge, a call for electricity stakeholders to take a “fresh” look at electricity policy in a state with no preexisting regulations or market structure. With adaptation as a central policy goal, the 51st State can be a model for technology and innovation that helps all states find ways to promote an optimized electricity system.

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Trending Topics in Electricity Today—Do Pay-for-Performance Capacity Markets Deliver the Outcomes We Need?

Competitive wholesale power markets are meant to sustain needed investment based on market participants hedging risks in response to transparent pricing in the energy and ancillary services markets (“the energy market”). This has led to concerns that some of the money and risk exposure needed to drive investment is “missing” from the energy markets. Some market operators have responded by introducing “capacity markets,” which are intended to bridge the gap between revenues available from energy markets and the all-in cost of desired capacity. Capacity markets offer commitments, still short-term relative to most investment timescales, to make fixed payments for the right to call on the resource when needed.

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Trending Topics in Electricity Today – What can we learn from evolving renewable contracts and grid operations?

The electric grid is undergoing a rapid metamorphosis as renewables become a significant part of the system. These new technologies are entering a system designed around a very different set of resources. As low-cost renewables provide a growing share of the electricity, grid operations—and thus power markets, financial structures, and policies—must evolve. Indeed, some already have; this article draws lessons from power contracts and markets about the evolving role of renewables from two different organized markets.

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Trending Topics in Electricity Today – Efficiency: Can we accept less stringent oversight if it means better outcomes?

Energy efficiency is a big business; $6.3 billion was budgeted for ratepayer-funded, utility-delivered state-efficiency programs in 2013, alongside $5 billion in private sector investment. However, some question whether this money could be spent more wisely to achieve greater levels of efficiency. Stories of state programs being mired in detail and bureaucracy, high costs of savings, and problems with cost-effectiveness tests have precipitated conversations about new approaches to ratepayer-funded utility-run energy efficiency programs. As stories like these continue to emerge, now is a reasonable time for policymakers to take a hard look at how to scale-up energy efficiency cost-effectively.

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Trending Topics in Electricity Today – Getting Ready for Distributed Energy Resources

Ask a distribution grid engineer in Germany or Hawaii how work is going these days, and you’re in for an earful. And policymakers would be smart to listen—while discussions of voltage regulation or “transient stability” can sound overly technical, the truth is that voltage stability in the distribution network is essential to taking advantage of distributed energy resources (DERs).

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